When Grandpa leaves land, he leaves legacy. Pensiri: A Talk with Nicolette ‘FarmHer Missy’ Gordon

A young pioneer in Internet radio, Nicolette “Missy” Gordon started MissyRadio.com in 2011, trending through an online business model that had only surfaced on the national scene.  The path made sense for a 20-something broadcast journalist who’d been “on the air” with Citadel Broadcasting’s WEMX-FM Max 94.1 for years. From there, she went on the graduate studies only to return to her alma mater as an area youth agent at the Southern University Agricultural Research and Extension Center.

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Nicolette Gordon managing her Internation radio station, MissyRadio.com

But it was a memory of a conversation she had with her grandfather, Robert Pope, that gives her a “mission” today.

“When I told him I was going back to school, he asked me ‘Why are you doing that? I’ve given you everything you need,” she said.

And he had. 

Grandpa Pope and his wife, Ora, left 128-acre farm in Greensburg, La., to a family of seven granddaughters with Missy being the one to pick up their legacy and return to farming. 

“I became a FarmHer by default,” she often jokes, “but in all actuality, it was destined to happen.” The third-generation farmer has pulled her talents and skills in youth development, small business management, community organizing, and nontraditional teaching to develop one of her largest personal projects: managing the family farm which includes livestock pasture and woodlands.

“My family has been farming for centuries, I have a sharecropping document from my great-great grandpa,” she said.

Her ultimate goal is to make sure that nobody in my community is hungry, and that our youth never forget what self-sustainability really looks like, she said. “As an assistant area agent, working with youth is 90 percent of my appointment. It’s been quite amazing to see the many youth that are still interested in agriculture.

“I have noticed that urban farming is has taken on a life of its own, and it’s a wonderful thing. It’s one of the easiest ways that we can eradicate food deserts in inner cities such as Baton Rouge and New Orleans,” she said.

However, she believes we’ve become too far removed from self-sustainability. “I can remember, as a child, we shelled our beans for dinner at Big Momma house…At eight years old, I knew how to plant, harvest, and shell speckled butter beans and crowder peas.”

“My grandfather would always talk to me about preserving his legacy,” said Gordon. She began learning the business management side of farming and in 2018 she was selected to participate in the Southern University Ag Center’s Small Farmer Agricultural Leadership Institute. She is a certified master gardener with a certificate in farm risk management.

Now, she is known in Ag circles as FarmHer Missy. 

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FarmHer Missy surveying plots in Greensburg, La.

Why are you bringing Ag to your family and to the community? I would not say that I am bringing Ag to our community.  I think I serve as a voice to remind my family & community that, “Hey this is where we come from, and this is a skill-set that we can’t afford to lose.” 

What’s your mission/goal with your land? Basically, my mission is to pick-up where my grandfather left off but developing an Ag Enterprise.

How much time are you currently spending in agriculture? I like to think every day is a teachable moment in agriculture. Agriculture is literally tied back to everything that we do, be it the workplace or at home. In the near future, we will open our farm for farm demo, and professional development opportunities.

Who’s farming with you now? It’s definitely a family affair! My uncle, Robyn Pope, is a very important component of our farming operation because he knows every detail about our farm.

Why are you farming when so many people are leaving agriculture and farming because of the labor and low wage? Farming is fulfilling, therapeutic, and it keeps me humbly connected to my roots. It is so important to never forget that farming was the only way of life for many of our families in rural America. So in essence, it can never be primarily about earning a wage for me.  This is the preservation of my families legacy for me, and there’s no amount of money that can ever top that… I love it! Many of the Baby Boomers will say, “Farming is hard work!” My reply is always, “Somebody gotta do it!”

By Candace J Semien
Jozef Syndicater reporter
@jozefsyndicate

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This feature, ‘Pensiri: A Talk with..,’ is a fascinating spotlight using narrative interviews and quick peeks into the interesting and unique lives of “average” human beings. From their spontaneous adventures, triumphs after tragedies, comical failures, and even the oddities of their personality, everybody has a story and every life has meaning. Enjoy the stories they share with Jozef Syndicate writers.

Comments
5 Responses to “When Grandpa leaves land, he leaves legacy. Pensiri: A Talk with Nicolette ‘FarmHer Missy’ Gordon”
  1. Stephen Pope says:

    . Happy to read of your success! My POPE line originates in Robeson County, NC. Looking forward to networking. Stephen

  2. Deloris says:

    Such an inspirational story! I love the fact that such a young lady decided to preserve her grandfathers legacy!

  3. Iola Gordon-Duncan says:

    Way to go, cousin. I’m very proud of you and the legacy that continues to ‘grow’ in our family.

  4. Edward Miles Jr says:

    Wow!!!,look at you ,omg ,trust me poppa Pope smiling down on you all praise be,missy I’m so proud of you!!!!,that’s what I’m talking about,even though I haven’t seen you since you were a little one,you have certainly made your mark in this world lil sister/my bad Queen!!!,way to rep your family, God bless and take care,peace n love.

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